Saturday, 29 October 2011

FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Toolkit

This is a useful FAQ Document by the UK Health and Safety Executive.

Sample Question:

What is the toolkit?

Answer: The Toolkit is a collection of tools that have been developed by HSE to help employers/employees to
identify common risk factors covering manual handling operations including lifting, carrying, pushing, pulling and repetitive tasks. The tools have been designed to help assessors’ break down tasks and identify task elements that could pose a risk to workers and help evaluate potential solutions or improvements.

Click here > FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Toolkit

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FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Manual Handling and Label

This is a useful FAQ Document by the UK Health and Safety Executive.

Sample Question:

What can be done to help prevent manual handling injuries?

Answer: In simple terms, the main thing is a risk assessment, though there are other considerations: Firstly, does the load need to be moved at all?

If so, can it be moved mechanically? For example by using a handling aid, such as a pallet truck, an electric or hand-powered hoist, or a conveyor? Advice on the many different types of lifting and handling aids is contained in. Are you making the best use of lifting and handling aids?


Click here > FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Manual Handling and Label

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FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - General Questions

This is a useful FAQ Document by the UK Health and Safety Executive. FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - General


Sample Question:

What is a Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD)?

Answer: MSD is a broad umbrella label for many types of aches and pains, and treatment is determined by the exact medical diagnosis. They fall largely into three types:

* Upper limb disorders

* Lower limb disorders

* Back pain

Click here > FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - General



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Friday, 28 October 2011

FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Display Screen Equipment

This is a useful FAQ Document by the UK Health and Safety Executive.

Sample Question:

How long and how often should breaks be for DSE work and what should I do during breaks?

Answer: This depends on the kind of work you are doing. There is no legal guidance but it is advisable to break up long spells of DSE work. Short frequent breaks are better than longer ones but less frequent ones such as 5–10 minute breaks every hour are better than 20 minutes every 2 hours. Ideally users should have some choice about when to take breaks. Most jobs provide opportunities to pause from DSE work to do other tasks, such as filing or copying. If there are no such natural changes of activity in your job, your employer should plan for you to have rest breaks. It is best if breaks or changes of activity allow the user to get up from their workstation and move around, or at least stretch and change posture.

Click here > FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Display Screen Equipment


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FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Lower Limb Disorders

This is a useful FAQ Document by the UK Health and Safety Executive.

Sample Question:

What are LLDs?

Answer: Lower limb disorders (LLDs) affect the legs and feet, from hips to toes. About 80% of damage to the hips, knees and legs at work is due to overuse. Workers may report lower limb pain, aching and numbness without a specific disease being identified or present.

Click here >FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Lower Limb Disorders


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Thursday, 27 October 2011

FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Upper Limb Disorders

This is a useful FAQ Document by the UK Health and Safety Executive.

Sample Question:

What are ULDs?

Answer: Upper limb disorders (ULDs) affect the arms from shoulder to fingers or the neck including problems with the soft tissues, muscles, tendons and ligaments, along with the circulatory and nerve supply to the limb.

Click here > Musculoskeletal Disorders - FAQs - Upper Limb Disorders


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FAQs - Musculoskeletal Disorders - Back pain

This is a useful FAQ Document by the UK Health and Safety Executive.

Sample Question:

What is back pain?

Answer: Back pain is any ache, pain, tension, or disorder that affects the muscles or bones of the back from the base of the neck to the hips. It can be caused by damage to the muscles or the bones of the spine and ribs or to the disc between the vertebrae.

Click here >Musculoskeletal Disorders - FAQs - Back pain


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Wednesday, 26 October 2011

HSE Guidance on leading health and safety at work

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 417) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.


Click here > INDG 417 Leading Health and Safety Work

This guidance sets out an agenda for the effective leadership of health and safety. It is designed for use by all directors, governors, trustees, officers and their equivalents in the private, public and third sectors. It applies to organisations of all sizes


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Tuesday, 25 October 2011

HSE Guidance A quick guide for clients on the CMD Regulation

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 411) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.


Click here > INDG 411 Want construction work done safely? A quick guide for clients on the CMD Regulations 2007

Who needs to know about the Regulations?

Anyone having construction or building work carried out has legal duties under the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007 (CDM 2007), unless they are a domestic client.

A domestic client is someone who lives, or will live, in the premises where the work is carried out. The premises must not relate to any trade, business or other undertaking. Although a domestic client does not have duties under CDM 2007, those who work for them on construction projects will.


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HSE Guidance A toolbox talk on leaning ladder and stepladder

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 403) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.


Click here > INDG 403 A toolbox talk on leaning ladder and stepladder safety

This talk can be used to help improve the competence of workers using leaning ladders and stepladders across all

industry sectors. The talk is divided into three sections, which can be given individually or together:

> hazards and pre-use checks;

> positioning;

> safe use.


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HSE Guidance on Safe use of ladders and Stepladders

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 402) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.


Click here > INDG 402 Safe use of ladders and stepladders

A third of all reported fall-from-height incidents involve ladders and stepladders – on average this accounts for 14 deaths and 1200 major injuries to workers each

year. Many of these injuries are caused by inappropriate or incorrect use of the equipment. This guidance is to help employers:

know when

■■ to use a ladder;

■■ decide how to go about selecting the right sort of ladder for the particular job;

■■ understand how to use it;

■■ know how to look after it; and

■■ take sensible safety precautions.


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HSE Guidance on Inspecting Fall Arrest Equipment

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 367) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.


Click here > INDG 367 Inspecting fall arrest equipment made from webbing or rope.

This leaflet is mainly aimed at employers who are responsible for the use of fall arrest equipment incorporating energy-absorbing lanyards made from webbing. It gives generic advice on inspection regimes for this equipment where it is used to provide protection against falls from a height. However, many of the principles can also be applied to non-energy-absorbing lanyards and safety harnesses used for the same purpose. They can also be applied to similar equipment made from

rope. The leaflet does not cover other equipment such as anchor points. Employers should consult the manufacturer and/or supplier of the equipment for any productspecific inspection requirements.



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HSE Guidance on Work Equipment - PUWER 98

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 291) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.


Click here > INDG 291 Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998

This leaflet provides information about the legal requirements of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER) which came into force on 5 December 1998.


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Buying new machinery

The UK HSE has recently updated its INDG 271 guidance document.


Buying new machinery - A short guide to the UK law and your responsibilities when buying new machinery for use at work. The leaflet explains the main aspects of health and safety law you need to know about when buying new machinery. Although the laws look complicated, they can be summed up as requiring that any new machinery you buy for use at work is safe.

Click here > INDG 271



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Supplying new machinery

The UK HSE has recently updated its INDG 270 guidance document.


Supplying new machinery - A short guide to the law and your responsibilities when supplying machinery for use at work. The leaflet can help you if you are supplying machinery for use at work. It explains the main health and safety requirements of the UK law and what you can do in practice to meet them.

Click here > INDG 270




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HSE Guidance on Manual Handling Assessment Charts

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 383) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.

Click here > INDG 383 Manual handling assessment charts

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), including manual handling injuries, are the most common type of occupational ill health in the UK and their prevention is a priority for HSC/E. It is important to remember that:


> things can be done to prevent MSDs;

> preventative measures are cost-effective;

> you cannot prevent all MSDs, so early reporting of symptoms, proper treatment and suitable rehabilitation is essential.



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HSE Guidance on Best use of Lifting and Handling Aids

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 398) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.


Click here > INDG 398 Are you making the best use of lifting and handling aids?

Frequent and heavy lifting and handling can cause back injuries. But using lifting and handling aids can remove or reduce that risk and keep workers healthy and at work.

This guidance is intended for managers, employees and their representatives and others involved in the selection of lifting and handling aids.


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HSE Guidance for new and expectant mothers who work

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 373) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.


Click here > INDG 373 A guide for new and expectant mothers who work

This guide helps answer some of the questions you may have about continuing to work while pregnant or about returning to work after giving birth. In particular, it sets out what action you need to take and what action your employer should take to protect your health and safety and that of your child.


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HSE Guidance on working VDUs

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 36) by the UK Health and Safety Executive.

Click here > INDG 36 Working with VDUs

This leaflet is a guide for people who work with visual display units (VDUs), and their employers. It:

■■ answers questions that are most often asked about VDUs and health;

■■ gives a summary of the law on VDU work (the Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992), and outlines what employers and employees should do to comply;

■■ suggests some simple adjustments that users can make to workstations and screens to make them more comfortable and easy to use; and

■■ explains how employers and users can get further advice.


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HSE Guidance on Manual Handling

This is a useful recent release / updated Industrial Guidance Document (INDG 143) by the UK Health and Safety Executive

Click here > INDG 143 Getting to grips with manual handling

This booklet explains the problems associated with manual handling and sets out best practice in dealing with them. The advice is intended for managers of small firms or similar organisations. But the general principles are relevant to all workplaces, whatever their size. Avoiding injuries from manual handling makes sound business sense.





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